Create+Inspire
shared dreams
Create+Inspire
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"Man came silently into the world. As a matter of fact he trod so softly that, when we first catch sight of him as revealed by those indestructible stone instruments, we find him sprawling all over the old world from the Cape of Good Hope to Peking. Without doubt he already speaks and lives in groups; he already makes fire…. Thus, in the eyes of science, which at long range can only see things in bulk, the ‘first man’ is and can only be a crowd, and his infancy is made up of thousands and thousands of years…."
Teilhard de Chardin, in The Phenomenon of Man (via beingblog)
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atlasobscura:

TODRA GORGE -PROVINCE DE TINGHIR, MOROCCO
Situated on the east side of the High Atlas Mountains in Morocco, the Todra Gorge is recognized around the world as one of the most spectacular canyons.
Here, both the Todra and Dades Rivers have carved out cliff-sided canyons on their final 25-mile stretch through the mountains, leaving behind this series of reliefs and etches in the rock. The Todra is the name of the last 600 meters (just under 2,000 feet) of the canyons. In places, this gorge measures just 33 feet across, but the cliffs are more than 500 feet tall on either side. The river has since dried up, leaving only the imagination to picture the powerful natural forces that once carved this region.
Learn more about the nearby village and other amazing destinations in the area at Atlas Obscura
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atlasobscura:

PAINT MINES INTERPRETIVE PARK -CALHAN, COLORADO
Fantastical sandstone hoodoos, and other weird geological formations made of sand and colorful clay, brought ancient Native Americans to this spot as far back as 9,000 years ago to collect clay for colorful pottery and today the Paint Mines Interpretive Park remains a geological wonder hidden on the eastern plains in El Paso County.
The park asks visitors to stay off the sandstone formations, and stick strictly to the trail, which winds in and around the park in a three-mile loop. There is no visitor center or shops (however there are bathrooms), simply strange colors and shapes rising from the land all around. 
learn more about this fascinating geography
atlasobscura:

PAINT MINES INTERPRETIVE PARK -CALHAN, COLORADO
Fantastical sandstone hoodoos, and other weird geological formations made of sand and colorful clay, brought ancient Native Americans to this spot as far back as 9,000 years ago to collect clay for colorful pottery and today the Paint Mines Interpretive Park remains a geological wonder hidden on the eastern plains in El Paso County.
The park asks visitors to stay off the sandstone formations, and stick strictly to the trail, which winds in and around the park in a three-mile loop. There is no visitor center or shops (however there are bathrooms), simply strange colors and shapes rising from the land all around. 
learn more about this fascinating geography
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skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?
It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.
You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 
But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.
Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!
Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen
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instagram:

Up close inside Chile’s watery Marble Cathedral

To see more photos and videos from Marble Cathedral, browse the #catedralesdemarmol hashtag and explore the Lago General Carrera location page.

Instagrammers from around the world trek to Catedral de Marmol, or the “Marble Cathedral,” on Chile’s General Lake Carrera to photograph the dazzling series of water-filled caves and tunnels. The unique rock structures were formed by over 6,000 years of waves crashing against the Patagonian Andes, and geologists attribute the water’s intense blue to the presence of finely ground glacial silt. The Marble Cathedral can be explored by boat or kayak, allowing adventurers to get an up-close look.

Though beautiful, the Catedrales de Marmol are not easy to reach. Adventurers must fly 1287 kilometers (800 miles) from Santiago to the city of Coyhaique, and brave an additional 322 kilometers (200 miles) of dirt roads to reach General Lake Carrera.
instagram:

Up close inside Chile’s watery Marble Cathedral

To see more photos and videos from Marble Cathedral, browse the #catedralesdemarmol hashtag and explore the Lago General Carrera location page.

Instagrammers from around the world trek to Catedral de Marmol, or the “Marble Cathedral,” on Chile’s General Lake Carrera to photograph the dazzling series of water-filled caves and tunnels. The unique rock structures were formed by over 6,000 years of waves crashing against the Patagonian Andes, and geologists attribute the water’s intense blue to the presence of finely ground glacial silt. The Marble Cathedral can be explored by boat or kayak, allowing adventurers to get an up-close look.

Though beautiful, the Catedrales de Marmol are not easy to reach. Adventurers must fly 1287 kilometers (800 miles) from Santiago to the city of Coyhaique, and brave an additional 322 kilometers (200 miles) of dirt roads to reach General Lake Carrera.
instagram:

Up close inside Chile’s watery Marble Cathedral

To see more photos and videos from Marble Cathedral, browse the #catedralesdemarmol hashtag and explore the Lago General Carrera location page.

Instagrammers from around the world trek to Catedral de Marmol, or the “Marble Cathedral,” on Chile’s General Lake Carrera to photograph the dazzling series of water-filled caves and tunnels. The unique rock structures were formed by over 6,000 years of waves crashing against the Patagonian Andes, and geologists attribute the water’s intense blue to the presence of finely ground glacial silt. The Marble Cathedral can be explored by boat or kayak, allowing adventurers to get an up-close look.

Though beautiful, the Catedrales de Marmol are not easy to reach. Adventurers must fly 1287 kilometers (800 miles) from Santiago to the city of Coyhaique, and brave an additional 322 kilometers (200 miles) of dirt roads to reach General Lake Carrera.
instagram:

Up close inside Chile’s watery Marble Cathedral

To see more photos and videos from Marble Cathedral, browse the #catedralesdemarmol hashtag and explore the Lago General Carrera location page.

Instagrammers from around the world trek to Catedral de Marmol, or the “Marble Cathedral,” on Chile’s General Lake Carrera to photograph the dazzling series of water-filled caves and tunnels. The unique rock structures were formed by over 6,000 years of waves crashing against the Patagonian Andes, and geologists attribute the water’s intense blue to the presence of finely ground glacial silt. The Marble Cathedral can be explored by boat or kayak, allowing adventurers to get an up-close look.

Though beautiful, the Catedrales de Marmol are not easy to reach. Adventurers must fly 1287 kilometers (800 miles) from Santiago to the city of Coyhaique, and brave an additional 322 kilometers (200 miles) of dirt roads to reach General Lake Carrera.
instagram:

Up close inside Chile’s watery Marble Cathedral

To see more photos and videos from Marble Cathedral, browse the #catedralesdemarmol hashtag and explore the Lago General Carrera location page.

Instagrammers from around the world trek to Catedral de Marmol, or the “Marble Cathedral,” on Chile’s General Lake Carrera to photograph the dazzling series of water-filled caves and tunnels. The unique rock structures were formed by over 6,000 years of waves crashing against the Patagonian Andes, and geologists attribute the water’s intense blue to the presence of finely ground glacial silt. The Marble Cathedral can be explored by boat or kayak, allowing adventurers to get an up-close look.

Though beautiful, the Catedrales de Marmol are not easy to reach. Adventurers must fly 1287 kilometers (800 miles) from Santiago to the city of Coyhaique, and brave an additional 322 kilometers (200 miles) of dirt roads to reach General Lake Carrera.
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skunkbear:

skunkbear:

The mighty Tremoctopus. Behold!

I saw some blanket octopus posts floating around tumblr today, but I noticed they left out one of my favorite characteristics of the Tremoctopus: their extreme sexual dimorphism. So I thought I’d reblog this old post.
skunkbear:

skunkbear:

The mighty Tremoctopus. Behold!

I saw some blanket octopus posts floating around tumblr today, but I noticed they left out one of my favorite characteristics of the Tremoctopus: their extreme sexual dimorphism. So I thought I’d reblog this old post.
skunkbear:

skunkbear:

The mighty Tremoctopus. Behold!

I saw some blanket octopus posts floating around tumblr today, but I noticed they left out one of my favorite characteristics of the Tremoctopus: their extreme sexual dimorphism. So I thought I’d reblog this old post.
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wishflowers:

outdoor dining via Inspire Bohemia
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simplypi:

Loft
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skunkbear:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).
These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).
Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.
skunkbear:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).
These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).
Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.
skunkbear:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).
These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).
Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.
skunkbear:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).
These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).
Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.
skunkbear:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).
These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).
Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.
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Q: i love npr, and didn't realize there were any tumblrs actually run officially by the organization - is there any way someone could send me a few links to other npr run blogs? i'd love that! thanks for doing what you're doing :)
Asked by yourunclelou